TOTD // 30/07 // Jennifer Cardini

Published: July 30, 2017, words by John Carter

With young parents both into clubbing, and listening to the likes of Joy Division, Coil, Depeche Mode, Aphex Twin, LFO, and Autechre when she started DJing, it was inevitable Jennifer Cardini would pursue a successful career in music.

Jennifer Cardini began DJing in the South of France in 1994, however after feeling quite isolated in the small scene, she decided to branch out in order to make her mark as a DJ. Her first major DJing achievement was becoming a resident at Le Pulp, setting her name firmly in Paris’s queer dance music scene. With her major artist influences at the time being “Carl Craig’s melodies, Aux 88 beats, Knuckles sexiness and Underground Resistance”, she began to hone her skills behind the decks.

Interestingly, Jennifer Cardini constructs her sets backwards. When preparing, she often starts by choosing the last track, her destination, and then builds the journey she’d like everyone to travel with her from that. She likes her sets to be smart, entertaining and open. “Generosity is essential to me”, she states in an interview for Fifteen Questions. With some favourite mixes from the likes of Andrew Weatherall, Roman Flugel and Barnt, Jennifer Cardini has no shame in jumping from genre to genre when she DJs.

Cardini’s acclaimed Correspondant label began as a club night at Rex Club, following the closure of Le Pulp. The label-side of the project came into fruition after her move from Paris to Cologne, where Cardini found a mutual respect with the local label and distributor Kompakt. In six years the label has released over 50 EPs and albums from a host of talented artists; a select few of which we’ve featured here this week in our takeover in celebration of the label’s latest album, Compilation 05. To end the takeover in style we have none other than the label owner herself selecting four tracks from the artists that have most inspired her DJing over the years.

An advocate for the LGBT community in dance music, Jennifer Cardini also contributed to our Pride takeover in 2016.

via youtube

Depeche Mode

Waiting for the Night

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“Violator came out in 1990, the same year I started to go to Raves. I see that album as a direct link between what I was listening to as a teenager and Electronic music. It prepared me for it, somehow. ‘Waiting For The Night’,  ‘Clean’ or ‘ lue Dress’  are so minimal and Kraftwerk-ish. It might sound strange but I can totally hear and connect this album to Aux 88 or some of the first Detroit records I bought when I started to DJ. The album is way more electronic than their previous ones. Alan Wilder used the ARP 2600 synth which is one of my favourites. I guess he is responsible for my unconditional love for pads!”
via youtube

Drexciya

Black Sea

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“One of my most cherished records. I’m a huge fan of James Stinson’s work; his work as a part of Drexciya with Gerald Donald, but also of his solo project The Other People Place. Lifestyles of the Laptop Café is one of my all time favourite albums. Both projects were so futuristic and in advance in regards to how Techno, House, Electro would evolve. A bit like they had already processed it all.  I love the energy of Drexciya, the darkness that always gets saved by the craziness their melodies. ‘Black Sea’ is an amazing track but I also really really love ‘Journey Home’. There is so much humour and life in that track. Drexciya is also featured on The Martian’s track called ‘War dance on Red Planet o5’, which is one of the first records I bought as a DJ. Check it out. ”
via youtube

LFO

Freeze

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“This had really a big impact on me. It was released in 1991, one year after Violator. My world shifted after that album. I stopped listening to The Cure, Sisters of Mercy and all the music that was on my auto-reverse Walkman at that time. After that anything from Warp, Detroit or Chicago I could find I bought and played for hours until my neighbours complained so much that I had to move. Frequencies, Artificial intelligence and Selected Ambient Works 2 from Aphex Twin are the three records that have influenced me the most and I still feel it today in my A&R work for Correspondant and Dischi Autunno, and of course in my DJ selection. Electronic music and technology might have evolved and mutated but Freeze is still quit modern and not that far from Fatima Yamaha, for example.”
via youtube

Robert Hood

Museum

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“Robert Hood is still releasing outstanding music! This came out in 1994. I was crazy about this record. There is not really so much to write to here, you either get it or you don’t. Just pure groove!”

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