TOTD // 29/07 // Khidja (Florentin & Andrei)

Published: July 29, 2017, words by Oli Katz

Part of the Correspondant takeover


Khidja (pronounced Khadeeja) are seemingly unstoppable at present. The Romanian duo have been winning over hearts with their slow-paced psychedelic jams. Starting in the 10th grade in the backyard of their German High School, they found the name “Khidja” by stumbling upon an old record by the legendary band Mandrill, which included a track with that same name. Fusions of styles, from latin and prog to funk and jazz, is what they’re all about. Their music is a true journey, changing and transforming. While collecting and absorbing music from all over the world for many years they eventually found interest in the roots of their home country. These sounds can be heard in their first few releases, alongside mixtures of Middle-Eastern electronic music now synonymous with Syrian wedding singer Omar Souleyman.

Their release via Malka Tuti, El Fadaa, was the release that really caught my attention. Premiered by Les Yeux Orange, the duo’s Middle-Eastern influences are shown through a spoken poem by Alan Berliner, live instruments mixed with electronics and some Arabic singing, all intertwined together to form a special, psychedelic journey lasting twelve minutes. In the years to follow they’ve returned to Malka Tuti and Especial, as well as joining the Love On The Rocks and, this year, Hivern Discs families. They also joined Correspondant, with a track contribution on their 5th compilation alongside Zombies In MiamiBorusiade and many others. Celebrating the release, Khidja have picked out four tracks that have influenced their productions.

via youtube

Virginia

Blue Pyramid

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“Discovered about five years ago through our friend The Holy Fix. We recently did a cover of it (out soon on Dark Entries) and since there were no multi tracks we had to replay it from scratch to be able to deconstruct it again. It’s a perfect example of how much you can do with so little, especially if you have just three good elements, melody (violin), bass (303) and drums (Alesis HR-16). The people behind it were Virginia and Dave Ball (of Soft Cell) and it appeared on one of the Jack The Tab comps that came through the Psychic TV temple.”
via youtube

Andrew Poppy

The Amusement

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“Andrew was part of The Lost Jockey (which included members of Man Jumping) and occasionally did arrangements for Psychic TV. His sound was clearly influenced by Steve Reich’s post minimal music and we love how the intertwining of the rhythm takes it into sparsely unexplored territories. It feels a bit like the excitement you get when looking through the Contemporary / Classical section at a record store and actually finding something you could play at a party.”
via youtube

Man Jumping

Jumpcut

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“One of Khidja’s cult albums along the years. Imagine the world of minimalists like Steve Reich or Philip Glass but bring the sound of New York in the late 70s into the mix; mainly afro, disco and fusion elements. Bright tones and nostalgic melodies but mainly dark tones. “Dark deep darkness and splendour”. On its original release, their LP Jumpcut was chosen as one the records of the year by The Times, The Guardian and The Observer. Brian Eno was quoted as saying that “Man Jumping was the most important band in the world.””

Terre Thaemlitz

Raw Through a Straw

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“This track was our introduction to Terre’s incredible sonic universe. We think Terre is one of the most interesting new artists out there. She spent her youth as a “hillbilly gender bender” to later become a musician, label owner and public speaker. Terre’s work combines themes of identity politics including gender, sexuality, class, linguistics, ethnicity and race. We heard this track for the first time at our dear “Web-Club” in Bucharest, Bogman (DJ Sleek) would play this at very late hours. Sometimes it would be just the two of us listening to him. The track would get introduced by a long ambient bit that would eventually morph into a groove, followed by the Incredible Bongo Band drum loop sample and transcendental M1 improvisation. It grows into a monster by the end.”

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