TOTD // 06/03 // Dixon Avenue Basement Jams

Published: March 6, 2017, words by John Hardy

Part of the Dixon Avenue Basement Jams takeover


Glaswegian label Dixon Avenue Basement Jams’ label aesthetic is described as ‘real rockin’ raw shit from the street for the clubs’. Through the imprint’s half a decade lifespan (yup, 2012 was five years ago), they have become synonymous with abrasive, rough-round-the-edges house music guaranteed to get the tamest dancefloor looking like five minutes before Saturday night closing in Glasgow. Releasing early work from now huge names such as Denis Sulta and Marquis Hawkes, the label owners Dan Lurinsky and Kenny Grieve have shown a key ear for what makes a club tick.

DJs for years in their own right before forming DABJ, for their Tracks Of The Day takeover they decided to show us some of their favourite music from the imprint Pro-jex, a label they see as being formative in shaping the paths they took, alongside releasing some brilliant music. Kindly, the guys provided a summary for us about why they think the label was so good to accompany the tracks:

“We’ve decided to go with UK record label Pro-jex as our theme for the takeover. Not because it’s a seminal label or holds massive importance in the evolution of electronic music or even that it was home to this legend or that legend (even though it was), but plain and simply because it was fucking banging and we loved it.

“Pro-jex was run by Drum Club top boy Charlie Hall from around 1997 to roughly 2005 (we think). It was home to people like DJ Rush, Frankie Bones, DJ Deeon, Justin Berkovi and Wyndell Long, and was a no nonsense ghetto / jackin’ techno doof-doof-doof fest – proper dancefloor tracks to jerk the head off your shoulders.

“Back around 2000-2001 we were running a party called MONOX. Dan was heading the main techno room playing stuff from Magnetic North, PCP and Djax up beats and Kenny running Room 2 (aka The Smut Hut) spinning tunes from 20/20, Stickman and second wave Chicago labels like Relief and Classic. Therefore, Pro-jex was the perfect meeting point for what we were both into, and was probably an important catalyst for what we eventually wanted DABJ to sound like. It even spawned a break away ghetto-tech/booty night in Glasgow called BUTTOX which wasn’t much of a success, but still we like to tell ourselves we were ahead of our time. Anyway, here’s a selection of why we think Pro-Jex was important enough for us to use as our takeover theme, hope you enjoy.”

DABJ play fabric’s Forms on Friday 09 March where we’ll be providing earplugs with our All Ears campaign. Get yours here.

via youtube

DJ Deeon

The Baddest

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“Now as far as I’m concerned if we’re talking ghetto-tech or booty house, this track is THE ONE. Double options on the intro, where you can cut the previous track and drop the ridiculous stuttered high pitch wack intro to signal your intentions, or mix in that Guys vs Gals “cuss off” into the first verse which kinda lulls you into a false sense of security that this is one for the girls. But before you get all Pankhurst or start burning bras –  HOOOOLD UP!!! –  pop, there it is, full on tongue-in-cheek nasty filth, and that’s all your getting from here till the end. In all seriousness, I’ve played this track to all manner of dancefloor, and men and women alike lose their shit because it’s a great party track. This full EP is straight up booty house gold and a masterpiece of the genre in my tiny mind. Thank you Mr. Debo G.”
via youtube

DJ Rush

Look And See

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“This track was a Monox peak time BANGER. And, it still bangs just as hard. In fact, I’m pretty sure I’ve played it again recently in DABJ sets in the last year, or maybe I just dreamt I played it? Who knows, I’ll dig it out for future gigs just in case. I’ve been a fan of DJ Rush since his Doing It To Death album on Force Inc. He’s a mad cap motherfucker and back then he sounded like nothing else. His ‘Rush Returns’ track on Dance Mania was another favourite of mine. It sounded like it was recorded inside a shoe box, but so good! Anyway, back to this track, a total tension builder, hard jacking drums, dark repetition, and then he adds some funk with that vocal sample. Marquis Hawkes’ ‘Sealion Woman’ actually kinda reminded me of this a little when I first heard it, although that’s probably just me! There’s also some cool remixes on here from Steve Bicknell and Justin Berkovi.”
via youtube

Blimp

Bad Girl

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“I’m pretty sure this record came out a matter of weeks after the Deeon record, and was right in the middle of a purple patch for Pro-Jex. It has a sound that I pretty much still look for in a lot of records, and even now people like Mak and Pasteman are making tracks that have a very similar vibe. The blimp track has all those elements of those Dance Mania-esque tracks. The pops, squelches and that skippy looped beat. It’s the simple non-thinking dark bassline that hooks me in every time, marry that up with that rubber band synth loop and the seedy vocal and we’re off.”
via youtube

DJ Funk

Run (UK Extended Mix)

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“This (pretty obvious choice of a) track has been released on a zillion different labels. However, it would be fair to say that this particular release (along with the Jeff Mills Live At The Liquid Room mix) probably turned most peoples heads towards ‘Run’ or ‘Run UK’, and indeed towards DJ Funk. I think when this came out, I already owned it on a couple of other labels, but this version got the most play because it was the best and loudest cut (and in the best condition)! An absolutely relentless Chi-town ho down of a track and can easily be fitted in between the most groovin’ house tracks as well as the hardest of techno. Not played it for a hot minute, because it got done to death, but may be worth dusting off again soon!”

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