TOTD // 25/01 // Neville Watson

Published: January 25, 2017, words by Henry Murray

Part of the Craigie Knowes takeover


Neville Watson has been a stalwart of the UK’s house scene for nearly 20 years; one of these artists that has remained steady in the rushing torrent of trend changes. He has been consistently releasing records and playing out, whilst many of his peers from bygone years fell by the wayside long ago.

Watson can authentically retell the UK’s dance scene from its rave beginnings. In fact, he and his brother (renowned photographer Gavin Watson) did just that. Together they released Raving ‘89, a book that documents pictures and stories from the year that rave culture exploded. Watson accredits his DJing/production career to his formative years at raves and being saturated within rave culture as well as being a punter and eventually a resident DJ at Checkpoint Charlie, a now long-gone club in Reading. Watson describes Checkpoint Charlie as “hands down the best club I have ever played at or been to”.

Despite a stream of 12s since 2003, it wasn’t 2013 that Neville Watson released his first LP, Songs To Elevate Pure Hearts. An amalgamation of his preferred palets, the record is an eclectic dance album dedicated to his wife on dutch label, Crème Organization. It’s the culmination of his influences that are all deeply rooted in UK rave, acid, techno and acid.

Many will (rightly or wrongly) know Watson for his long-standing collaboration with KiNK. Initially they met after KiNK decided to thank Watson over MySpace for playing one of his records and subsequently found a shared interest in music taste. Soon after they started sending each other unfinished tracks, which according to KiNK, “Neville would start and I would finish”. Watson and the Bulgarian producer/DJ have released several records since 2008, worked dozens of remixes and played hardware-heavy live sets together relatively consistently. Their sound is referential, and often the duo have been referred to being part of what some called the “Acid House Revival” of the late 00s. They are unafraid of brandishing their influences through heavy use of 707s and big acid lines but they are of a few large room acts that don’t lose a sense of smallness, detail and colour.

Below you’ll find his selection for Tracks Of The Day. A list that reflects his keenness for techno, acid and house.

via youtube

Artefakt

Mirage

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“I love this track and what these guys are doing. Spacey, atmospheric techno that still hits hard on the dancefloor. There’s not enough of this stuff around right now.”
via youtube

Morganistic

In The Shadow

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“Early ambient techno jam from Luke Slater on seminal UK label, Irdial. I remember hearing this on an early 90s Future Sound of London show and being blown away by it, it took me a few years to track it down – taking my Walkman into unfriendly record shops and playing to surly staff. I eventually tracked it down at Fat cat.”
via youtube

Truncate

7_1 (Ambivalent Remix)

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“Driving, funked-up, acidic techno remix from my favourite producer right now, Ambivalent. His stuff always gets an outing from me.”
via youtube

Outboxx

Rumours feat. Naomi Jeremy

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“Outstanding house side project from Bristol’s Hodge. This is the kind of timeless dark and dirty house track that begs to be heard whilst lost in the smoke and strobe at 6am when the party has thinned out a bit and you can stretch out and sway about with your eyes closed. Killer!”

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