TOTD // 26/09 // Hugo LX

Published: September 26, 2016, words by Undefined author

After
breaking his way onto the jazz-oriented hip-hop scene alongside DJ Suspect as
The Funk League seven years back, Hugo LX has recently started his walk down
the path of house music. With a focus on a tough, groove-led sound, Hugo has
started to make a name for himself debuting on labels such as R2 Records and
Courtesy of Balance Recordings. His tracks sound rich as they manage to envelop
further into deeper house territories as each record is released. Despite this, however, the strength and weightiness of his productions remain uncompromised,
with his kick drums consistently offering his tracks a sense of urgency as they
thud along.

Now fighting
his way into the French underground house scene, Hugo LX has all the
ingredients to execute the heavy-duty Parisian sound; from his past being
firmly rooted in the land of hip-hop, to
his future holding true to the tough, My Love Is Underground-esque rhythms that
have been steadily released under Jeremy
Underground for the past six years or so. Aside from his productions however,
Hugo LX holds down a show on Rinse France and is a touring DJ that is only
going to see more gigs on his plate as time trails on. This is evident in his current bookings, with his next show being
in Berlin at Prince Charles on October 14 alongside

Secretsundaze

’s
very own Giles Smith and Mr. Mendel.

Ahead of this gig, we invited Hugo LX in for Tracks Of The Day. Here, he selects four diverse records from the vaults.

via youtube

Susumu Yokota

Wani Natte

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“Yokota’s body of work has a deep and special meaning to me. His music always impressed me by creating a wave of emotions with very little. Whether a guitar and a tape delay, whether a stack of bizarre samples, or simply a keyboard… I don’t care if it sometimes goes too far or not enough, I would take it anyway. As you never get to choose your family, I recommend you let Yokota’s music get around you like a good-spirited cousin you can meet occasionally. Also, the space and textures are incredible and add to the magic. Hey, this music should be accessible in museums… What do you think?”
via youtube

Ryuichi Sakamoto

Thousand Knives

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“I built most of my experiences around the idea that things could be viewed from one angle or another. Imagine electronic music just being a natural extension of natural acoustic events, or composition being improvisation at a lower speed, or vice versa. If I had to pick one single musician to epitomise this idea, it would surely be Sakamoto. His music could belong to every segment of any spectrum. Was the Thousand Knives a classical traditional piece adapted to synthesisers or an electronic pastiche of traditional Japanese music? My musical experience went to another level the day I accessed this boundless sound space and cruised from one point to another.”
via youtube

Lord Finesse

True and Living

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“It’s amazing how far 90s Hip Hop went, actually. Pete Rock, Easy Mo bee, Large Pro or Q-tip’s productions could take you to any place with a just a couple of samples and a decomposed breakbeat, and create some perfect vehicles for vocalist’s flows and ideas. As many Lord Finesse or D.I.T.C. pieces, this one is probably more complex and composite than many 90s beats (he ain’t called the funky technician for nothing!), although at the end it gives a perfectly balanced and homogenic blend. This music not only changed the aesthetic and production standards, but it was the direct follow up to the previous 50 years of music, and for that reason it quickly became our life soundtrack.”
via youtube

Joe Zawinul

Baptismal

  • Calm

  • Energetic

  • Euphoric

  • Happy

  • Melancholic

  • Nostalgic

  • Tense

  • Wonky

“One of JZ’s early masterpieces for several reasons. Each time I listen to a Zawinul composition or arrangement, I’m always overwhelmed by the way he manages the musical intensity in a very graphic way, building the song with distinct chapters. He was definitely one of the best storytellers in Jazz, alongside Shorter, and their alliance in Weather Report would forever confirm these abilities. Moreover, this song is one of the first piece forecasting the direction Miles would ultimately take three years later on Bitches Brew, with these rock-driven fast grooves and sporadic yet iconic horn sentences. I always felt this music laid the foundation for what techno and house would later develop.”

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